By

Why are you always chosen for ‘explosive testing’? - Airport_News



Are you wondering why it’s always you who’s asked to go through the extra ‘explosives’ test before you can clear screening—while your travel companion breezes on through?

In our recent posts, we've shed light on the various airport security methods, including why you’re sometimes asked to surrender your deodorant or hair spray that’s in an aerosol can. So we thought we’d answer the question “Why me?”

Security screening officers are required to undertake explosive trace detection (ETD) testing on a ‘random and continuous basis’. For more information on the ETD batch testing at Newcastle Airport click here.

If you are the only person walking through the screening point, then you must be tested. No profiling is used in selecting people for explosive testing. (We can confidently say you weren’t selected because of the way you look.)

ETD involves the security officer rubbing a ‘wand’ with a special pad on it, called a swab, against specific items including your buttons, belt, pockets, shirt cuffs, overcoats and jackets, head wear, footwear and any casts. If you are carrying baggage or personal items they also have to be tested.

The wand is then inserted into the ETD machine which tests the pad for explosives.  The sophisticated testing—which not only identifies explosives, but what the explosive is and how much has been detected—produces a report which is either negative, which means your screening is complete, or positive, which means you’ll require a second ETD test.

It’s not uncommon for a high percentage of our passengers to test positive as Newcastle Airport is close to Defence, mining, farming, and production regions, all of which use explosives or elements found in explosives through their day to day working environments.  Some cleaning products and toiletries (like some ladies perfumes) may also result in a positive ETD result.   

So, in response to your question as to why it is always you that is always chosen for the ETD test, the answer is you simply have bad luck to always be the ‘next cab off the rank’ through the screening point.

More information about the passenger screening process is available from the TravelSECURE website here:

http://travelsecure.infrastructure.gov.au/domestic/faq/airport_checks.aspx

Please note: You have the right to refuse you ETD testing, however, if you refuse to be screened, you will not be allowed to pass through the security screening point or to board your flight.

 
Comments
Abasskimaya
03-Oct-2015 09:35 AM
grey
02-Sep-2016 08:09 PM
Brian Burgess
26-Feb-2017 12:13 PM
Jennifer haigh
08-Apr-2017 02:58 PM
dave shutt
17-Nov-2017 07:23 PM
dave shutt
17-Nov-2017 07:39 PM
Abasskimaya
03-Oct-2015 09:35 AM
grey
02-Sep-2016 08:09 PM
Brian Burgess
26-Feb-2017 12:13 PM
Jennifer haigh
08-Apr-2017 02:58 PM
dave shutt
17-Nov-2017 07:23 PM
dave shutt
17-Nov-2017 07:39 PM
Leave a comment
 

You may also like :

Latest posts:

One team when it comes to safety - Airport_News

Today is the first day of Airport Safety Week, an industry-led initiative designed to promote safety for all employees working at an aerodrome.

Monthly check in: August 2017 - Airport_News

Passenger growth in August 2017 increased by 0.9% compared to the same month last year.
Flights
Transport
About
News
Contact Us

Why not stay up to date?

Your use of this website is governed by the Disclaimer. We will only use your personal information in accordance with our Privacy Policy.